5. Splng ErRors/ERrors of Gram-r, or improper use of the English language.
4. You don't live a commutable distance from the job opening. Hint: Another country is NOT a commutable distance!
3. You applied to every advertisement the recruiter posted. We get that you need a job, any job, but for crying out loud, be selective! Desperation isn't attractive on anyone, including a job seeker!
2. Your resume does not showcase what you represent. It is bland, and not focused on contributions. Perhaps 2013 should bring a professionally written resume to your search.
1. Your email address is WAY to personal, showcasing either your age, sexual preferences, or something inappropriate that screams "Too Much Information!"
 
 
Yes, my friends, this is a "Master of the Obvious" post that too many people are missing. I hope it can help, and as always, I'm going to be a little blunt. If you are a CFO and applying to an Accounts Payable position, I am not going to call you for my next CFO position. Why? Because you are not proving to me that you are able to read.

You are not what I am looking for in this role. Recruiter translation: thanks for wasting my time, but I would like to find someone pretty close to the job I posted. If you are interested in contacting your recruiter, call, send an email, text, even smoke signal. But look at what the job description is! Being overqualified is just as inappropriate as under qualified. You are going to be bored. You won't be challenged. And short of a nonexistent candidate pool, you are not going to be hired for the position for which you applied.

What can you do? Take the time to apply to jobs appropriate for your skill set. Network! (Yes, I am sure you heard that from me once or twice.) And most importantly, read, really read the job description!

 
 
A big frustration that many job seekers face is that they are looking for a targeted position and are being contacted by irrelevant jobs that are outside of their field. Now a choice needs to be made: is the job an opportunity in the door or a dead end situation?

Sometimes a lower level position in a large company with room for growth is a great way to get in, demonstrate your abilities, and get promoted, whereas getting into a small company where you will never have the opportunity to advance is not advantageous to your resume and your career.

Ask targeted questions in the interview. Find out if the position/company have room to grow. Talk to others at the company. Utilize www.linkedin.com and the web to see what others think of the internal workings of the company.


Don't just take an opportunity at face value: dig deeper, ask more, and identify if the role is the one for you or if you would be wasting time.

 
 
Have you ever wondered why actors are waiters during the day? I do not think that is a coincidence! To be able to audition, it is important for someone to have a flexible work schedule with the understanding that they can get shifts covered by someone, and where they are not committing to a 40-hour a week, no callout situation. On top of which, someone who acts is likely a people-person who endears their customers, thereby collecting higher tips.

Conversely, I have a very close friend who chose real estate and has worked as her own boss for many years. She self proclaims that she would not last 2 weeks as a "cubicle dweller" working a structured job with less than full flexibility. Some people are best with more guidance, and others succeed as self-starters or managers. Some of us like to work with people and others prefer to focus in a quiet area.

Another close friend of mine is unbelievably organized (and I am so jealous of her efficiency and ability to coordinate and visually layout) and she is also very skilled at determining the preferences of others. She has been a great success in retail management and has many years ahead of her with opportunity for growth and advancement.

Focus on what you enjoy as well as your strengths. The more engaged you are in your career, the more successful you will be. I can suggest the Myers-Briggs Type Inventory as a great assessment of your preferences and that suggests employment which fits your style.

There is nothing worse than having a job or career that does not fit who you are as a person!